Press Releases

The North Carolina Department of Revenue officially opened the 2023 individual income tax season and began downloading 2022 returns on Thursday, Feb. 2. Taxpayers who file state returns electronically will now receive acknowledgements.

The NCDOR officially began accepting 2022 income tax returns for Estates and Trusts on Friday, Jan. 27. The NCDOR will announce the opening date for Partnership and Corporate Income and Franchise returns as soon as it is confirmed.

The NCDOR anticipates accepting 2022 Corporate Income and Franchise, Partnership Income, and Estates and Trust Income tax returns by Friday, Jan. 27, and 2022 Individual Income tax returns by Friday, Feb. 3.

Secretary of Revenue Ronald G. Penny and members of the NCDOR leadership team will volunteer across the state to highlight Martin Luther King, Jr. Week, which is observed from Jan. 16 - 20.

The N.C. Department of Revenue has set the interest rate at 7 percent, an increase from 5 percent. The interest rate applies to refunds and assessments of tax.

The motor fuels and alternative fuels tax rate for the period of Jan. 1, 2023, through Dec. 31, 2023, will increase from 38.5 cents to 40.5 cents per gallon.

State tax relief is available to victims of Hurricane Ian in North Carolina. Details of the tax relief are available in a notice on the agency website.

The N.C. Department of Revenue (NCDOR) mailed checks to more than 3,900 North Carolina businesses awarded under Phase 2 of the Business Recovery Grant Program (BRG) on Thursday, Sept. 29. Businesses will begin to receive payments in the coming days.

Taxpayers who received a valid extension to file 2021 individual income tax returns that were originally due on April 15, 2022, must file those returns by Oct. 15. Since Oct. 15 falls on a Saturday, taxpayers have until Monday, Oct. 17 (i.e., the next succeeding day which is not a Saturday, Sunday, or legal holiday), to file their returns and not be subject to the late filing penalty.

Student loan forgiveness excluded pursuant to IRC 108(f)(5) is currently considered taxable income in North Carolina. The Department of Revenue is monitoring any further enactments by the General Assembly that could change the taxability of student loan forgiveness in North Carolina. 

Subscribe to Press Releases (RSS feed)